HENRY FORD: THE MAN TO BLAME FOR MOST OF LAST CENTURY’S WARS

We can blame Henry Ford for most of the last century’s wars

ABOUT 90% OF NEW YORK CITY CABS WERE ELECTRIC IN 1899

No kidding. This fleet of electric cars was built by the Electric Carriage and Wagon Company of Philadelphia.

In 1902 an electric car, the Baker Torpedo, became the first car to have an aerodynamic body that enclosed both the driver and the platform. This car at one point reached 80 mph in a speed test before crashing and killing two spectators. It was later clocked as high as 120 mph, but with spectators not invited this time.

Yes folks, that was 115 years ago.  And now, despite all the hoopla about Tesla electric cars and Nissan’s Leaf, what do you think their market share is in America?

Hope you are sitting down: 0.7%. Yes, less than 1%.

The tiny Norway has the highest penetration of electric cars in the world with 22%.

Ford killed the electric car market with its cheaper gas-powered autos

So who is to blame for all this pollution, global warming, not to mention most of the wars in the last century?

And for the fact that one of the world’s most archaic countries, Saudi Arabia, is now wagging the tail of the world’s most powerful country – the United States?

Henry Ford. Yes, good old socialist Henry is to blame for all that.

Why?

The price of a basic model electric car in the early 1900’s was about $1,000, with more lavishly decked out models costing closer to $3,000.

Enter Henry Ford, the Bill Gates of the early 20th century.

FORD’S LEGACY: DEMAND FOR OIL AND GAS EXPLODES

By 1915, Henry Ford, due in part to his innovative assembly line construction, was able to offer his cars at a base price of around $500 a piece. Which made it affordable for even average people, something that had never been the case before.

Little did these “average people” know that they were tying a noose around their own necks. Which Donald Trump tightened this weekend with a wicked $350 billion arms deal with the Saudi regime, one of the most backward and bloodthirsty government on the planet.

So think of old Henry as you see Trump bowing before the Saudi king, just like Obama whom he criticized for doing so. And then also think of the 200 million or so people who were killed in various wars in the last century.

Yes, oil and gas kills. It is killing this planet and its occupants. And its first victim was the electric car of the 19th century.


UPDATE SEP 17, 2017

ON THIS DAY IN HISTORY… SEP 17

1965

AMPHIBIOUS CARS ARRIVE IN FRANKFURT, GERMANY AFTER SAILING ACROSS THE ENGLISH CHANNEL

Another good idea killed by US regulation

ALTZAR: On May 22, I published the story “HENRY FORD: THE MAN TO BLAME FOR MOST OF LAST CENTURY’S WARS – ABOUT 90% OF NEW YORK CITY CABS WERE ELECTRIC IN 1899” – see http://wp.me/p71qWM-2c. Now, here’s another example of how the US government interfered to protect the domestic car makers at the expense of foreign competition and the US consumers.

And then they boast about fostering “free trade?” Free trade is like free press in America: It is only free if you own it (paraphrasing New York Times’ A.J. Liebling quote).

On September 17, 1965, four adventurous Englishmen arrive at the Frankfurt Motor Show in Germany after crossing the English Channel by Amphicar, the world’s only mass-produced amphibious passenger car. Despite choppy waters, stiff winds, and one flooded engine, the two vehicles made it across the water in about seven hours.

The Amphicar’s design, by the German engineer Hans Trippel, derived from the Schwimmwagen, the amphibious all-wheel-drive vehicle that Volkswagen had produced for the German armed forces during World War II. A company called the Quandt Group produced the Amphicars for seven years, from 1961 to1968; in all, they built about 3,900 of the little swimming convertibles.

Amphicars came in four colors–Beach White, Regatta Red, Lagoon Blue, and Fjord Green–and were powered from the rear by a 43-horsepower, four-cylinder Triumph Herald engine. On land, the cars used a four-speed-plus-reverse manual transmission. In the water, they used a transfer case that had two speeds: forward and backward. With the top and windows up, the Amphicar was remarkably seaworthy: Its front wheels acted as rudders and two nylon propellers chugged along in back. The car’s builders called it the “770,” because–in theory, at least–it could go 7 mph in the water and 70 mph on land.

To see an Amphicar hit either one of these speeds was rare, however: According to one owner, it was “the fastest car on the water and the fastest boat on the road.”

The four Englishmen left London on the morning of September 16, rolled down the ramp at Dover, and headed for France. About halfway across the Channel, a blocked bilge pump flooded one of the Amphicars; the other towed it the rest of the way to shore. When they arrived at Calais, the four travelers (with the help of the crowd that had gathered to see them) managed to drag the cars over the beach and to the gas station. The next day, they headed off to Frankfurt.

KILLED BY US REGULATION

About 3,000 Amphicars were imported into the United States. In fact, Quandt sold such a large proportion of the cars to Americans that in 1968, when the Motor Vehicle Air Pollution Act raised emissions standards to a level that the Amphicar couldn’t meet, the company just stopped building the cars altogether. Amphicar enthusiasts estimate that between 300 and 600 seaworthy vehicles remain on the road today.

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